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Brain Function and Psychotropic Drugs$
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Heather Ashton

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780192622426

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192622426.001.0001

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Drugs and memory

Drugs and memory

Chapter:
(p.215) 10 Drugs and memory
Source:
Brain Function and Psychotropic Drugs
Author(s):

Heather Ashton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192622426.003.0010

Increasing interest has focused recently on the possibility of pharmacological treatment for memory disorders. Drugs, of course, cannot be expected to replace degenerated neurones, but they might theoretically improve the function of surviving neurones in chronic diseases, hasten neuronal recovery in acute conditions, and perhaps prevent further neuronal damage in both. Such measures are unlikely to have specific effects on memory, but may produce general improvement in mental efficiency. In other circumstances it is advantageous to facilitate forgetting. For example, the use of amnesic drugs as preoperative medication may not only calm the patient but also forestall the laying down of unpleasant memories.

Keywords:   memory disorders, pharmacological treatment, neurones, neuronal recovery, mental efficiency, unpleasant memories

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