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Migraine: A Spectrum of Ideas$
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Merton Sandler and Geralyn M. Collins

Print publication date: 1990

Print ISBN-13: 9780192618108

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192618108.001.0001

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5-HT in migraine: evidence from 5-HT receptor antagonists for a neuronal aetiology

5-HT in migraine: evidence from 5-HT receptor antagonists for a neuronal aetiology

Chapter:
(p.128) 11. 5-HT in migraine: evidence from 5-HT receptor antagonists for a neuronal aetiology
Source:
Migraine: A Spectrum of Ideas
Author(s):

J.R. Fozard

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192618108.003.0011

The fact that antagonists at certain 5-HT receptor subtypes are effective in the prophylaxis or treatment of migraine implicates the endogenous amine in a causal role in the condition. On the basis of the properties and selectivities of such antagonists, this chapter discusses the potential significance of 5-HTlc, 5-HT2, and 5-HT3 receptors in the initiation, development, and symptomatology of migraine. The likely source(s) of the 5-HT needed to stimulate these sites are considered, and a hypothesis is proposed to implicate the activity of the 5-HT neurones arising in the mid-brain raphe nuclei in a key role in the aetiology of migraine. The ideas discussed here are developments and extensions of those expressed over a number of years in several review articles and are by no means unique.

Keywords:   5-HT receptor subtypes, neuronal aetiology, treatment of migraine, endogenous amine, symptomatology, 5-HT neurones

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