Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Hollywood AestheticPleasure in American Cinema$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Todd Berliner

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190658748

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190658748.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 31 March 2020

Crime Films during the Period of the Production Code Administration

Crime Films during the Period of the Production Code Administration

Chapter:
(p.157) Eight Crime Films during the Period of the Production Code Administration
Source:
Hollywood Aesthetic
Author(s):

Todd Berliner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190658748.003.0008

Chapter 8 demonstrates the ways in which ideological constraints in studio-era Hollywood shaped the aesthetic properties of an entire body of crime films, now commonly known as film noir. The ideological restrictions of the Production Code Administration posed creative problems that noir filmmakers solved through visual and narrative contortion. The contortions created challenges for audiences, who had to decode and make sense of films that may not show complete clarity or coherence in their storytelling. Film noir remains aesthetically engaging because it operates near the boundaries of classicism without sacrificing classical Hollywood’s accessibility and formal unity.

Keywords:   Film noir, Crime films, Production Code Administration, Violence in film, The Asphalt Jungle, Primacy effect, Film regulation, Censorship, Pickup on South Street

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .