Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Arguing Islam after the Revival of Arab Politics$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Nathan J. Brown

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190619428

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190619428.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 October 2019

Arab Constitutions, the Many Voices of the Public, and the Word of the One God

Arab Constitutions, the Many Voices of the Public, and the Word of the One God

Chapter:
(p.147) Chapter 6 Arab Constitutions, the Many Voices of the Public, and the Word of the One God
Source:
Arguing Islam after the Revival of Arab Politics
Author(s):

Nathan Brown

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190619428.003.0007

This chapter explores the nature of constitution making in the Arab world, demonstrating the effects of greater publicity in the drafting process, the ways in which the changing and escalating forms of publicity have expressed themselves in constitutional arguments about Islam, and how that has been reflected in constitutional texts. After tracing the slow growth of both publicity and of constitutional language concerning Islam in Arab constitution writing, it turns to the post-2011 experience of Tunisia and Egypt where Islamists became major political players yet the expansionary tendency regarding Islam came to an end. It demonstrates the effects of arguing about Islam on three levels. First, the arguments have had a growing effect on the constitutional texts. Second, along the way the formulas that were developed did not always have much legal effect. Third, the arguments shaped various groups’ affective orientation toward the political system.

Keywords:   Arab constitution, Islam, publicity, political values, constitutional argument, Tunisia, Egypt

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .