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Beyond the Arab Cold WarThe International History of the Yemen Civil War, 1962-68$
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Asher Orkaby

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190618445

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190618445.001.0001

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Chemical Warfare in Yemen

Chemical Warfare in Yemen

Chapter:
(p.129) 6 Chemical Warfare in Yemen
Source:
Beyond the Arab Cold War
Author(s):

Asher Orkaby

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190618445.003.0007

Nasser’s “long-breath strategy” from 1966 through the end of 1967 was focused on maintaining the security of the strategic triangle while using fewer troops. Instead, an intensive bombing campaign that included poison gas was used to target the vast royalist cave network in North Yemen. Despite Egypt’s violation of the Geneva Protocols of 1925, the international community failed to condemn the use of chemical weapons, demonstrating the tenacity of the poison gas taboo. Saudi Ambassador Jamil Baroody’s fierce campaign against UN Secretary General U Thant’s inaction failed to persuade the UN to act. The ICRC, NATO, United States, and UK refused to openly criticize Egypt, as they did not want to fall out of favor with Nasser and suffer economic or political repercussions.

Keywords:   Chemical Warfare, Poison Gas, Poison Gas Taboo, ICRC, Red Cross, Jamil Baroody, Geneva Protocol of 1925, U Thant

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