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Classical Traditions in Modern Fantasy$
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Brett M. Rogers and Benjamin Eldon Stevens

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190610050

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190610050.001.0001

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C. S. Lewis’s The Voyage of the “Dawn Treader” and Apuleius’ Metamorphoses

C. S. Lewis’s The Voyage of the “Dawn Treader” and Apuleius’ Metamorphoses

Chapter:
(p.145) 6 C. S. Lewis’s The Voyage of the “Dawn Treader” and Apuleius’ Metamorphoses
Source:
Classical Traditions in Modern Fantasy
Author(s):

Jeffrey T. Winkle

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190610050.003.0007

Jeffrey T. Winkle, in “C. S. Lewis’s The Voyage of the “Dawn Treader” and Apuleius’ Metamorphoses,” examines the ancient narrative and philosophical traditions that provided thematic and theological foundations for Lewis’s work. Winkle explores the observation that C. S. Lewis’s The Voyage of the “Dawn Treader” (1952) is, more so than the other books in the Narnia series, “generally about the spiritual life.” In comparing the many similarities between Apuleius’ narrator Lucius (transformed into an ass) and Lewis’s character Eustace Scrubb (transformed into a dragon), Winkle argues that both characters are ‘Platonic sinners,’ rendered and allowed to develop in accordance with Middle-Platonic morality and imagery that bridges classical and medieval worlds.

Keywords:   Apuleius, Lewis, C. S, Metamorphoses (aka The Golden Ass), Platonism, Voyage of the “Dawn Treader”, The

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