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Classical Traditions in Modern Fantasy$
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Brett M. Rogers and Benjamin Eldon Stevens

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190610050

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190610050.001.0001

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Genre, Mimesis, and Virgilian Intertext in George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire

Genre, Mimesis, and Virgilian Intertext in George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire

Chapter:
(p.308) 14 Genre, Mimesis, and Virgilian Intertext in George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire
Source:
Classical Traditions in Modern Fantasy
Author(s):

Ayelet Haimson Lushkov

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190610050.003.0015

Ayelet Haimson Lushkov, in “Genre, Mimesis, and Virgilian Intertext in George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire,” examines how the relationship between Martin’s Renly Baratheon and Loras Tyrell resonates with the Nisus and Euryalus episode in Virgil’s Aeneid. Lushkov takes seriously the presence of the classics in Martin’s Westeros, arguing that the Aeneid, as well as the Homeric resonances it carries along with it, helps us untangle some of the modern work’s bewildering mass of detail. Exploring the various ways in which the two erotic pairs double one another and switch roles, Lushkov identifies a complex network of images and connections that belong to—and so invite critique of—the greater epic tradition.

Keywords:   A Song of Ice and Fire (Game of Thrones), Aeneid, Euryalus and Nisus (characters in Virgil), Martin, George R. R, Virgil

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