Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Three StreamsConfucian Reflections on Learning and the Moral Heart-Mind in China, Korea, and Japan$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Philip J. Ivanhoe

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190492014

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190492014.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 August 2019

Itō Jinsai

Itō Jinsai

Chapter:
(p.157) Chapter 9 Itō Jinsai
Source:
Three Streams
Author(s):

Philip J. Ivanhoe

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190492014.003.0015

Like Dai Zhen in China and Jeong Dasan in Korea, Jinsai argued against the orthodox neo-Confucian conceptions of principle and qi. Like them, he argued that such ideas were never part of Confucianism and had insidiously crept into the tradition from Daoist and Buddhist sources. Also like them, he sought to unmask and root out foreign elements in the Confucian tradition and return to the original intent of the sages as revealed in the true meaning of the classics by employing a philologically based method, which he called the “Learning of Ancient Meanings.” But Jinsai offered a novel justification for the universal obligation to care for the world as oneself by advancing a view about how a creative and sustaining “Way of Heaven” shapes “single original qi” into the diverse phenomena of the world, making them all parts of a single “living thing.”

Keywords:   Itō Jinsai, Learning of Ancient Meanings, single original qi, living thing, sages, Way of Heaven

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .