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The British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1838–1956A History$
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James Heartfield

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190491673

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190491673.001.0001

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Egypt and the Sudan

Egypt and the Sudan

Chapter:
(p.267) 11 Egypt and the Sudan
Source:
The British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1838–1956
Author(s):

James Heartfield

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190491673.003.0013

Egypt in the nineteenth century had been an Ottoman outpost, but Mehmet Ali Pasha won home rule as Khedive, a title the Sublime Porte recognized for his grandson Ismail. Egypt was already heavily indebted, more in interest on loans to Britain and France than in taxes to Istanbul. Ismail drew European officers like Samuel Baker, Emin Pasha and Charles Gordon in to his plan to expand south, by promising to abolish slavery. The Anti-Slavery Society was skeptical of Ismail, but championed Gordon’s mission. In reaction, the Mahdi led a revolt in the Sudan, and Gordon was besieged and then killed. The Society played a key role in organizing anti-slavery missions and police departments in Egypt that gradually suborned the country’s independence, until it became a “veiled protectorate”.

Keywords:   Khedive, Mahdi, Egypt, Sudan, Gordon of Khartoum, Imperialism

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