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The British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1838–1956A History$
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James Heartfield

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190491673

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190491673.001.0001

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The Anti-Slavery Society turns to East Africa

The Anti-Slavery Society turns to East Africa

Chapter:
(p.225) 9 The Anti-Slavery Society turns to East Africa
Source:
The British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 1838–1956
Author(s):

James Heartfield

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190491673.003.0011

In the decade after the end of the Atlantic slave trade the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society underwent a marked turnover of its leadership. Joseph Sturge had died in 1859 and he was followed by Lord Brougham in 1868, while the Society’s secretary Louis Chamerovzow retired. After some uncertainty the Society appointed Charles Allen, who took it in the direction of a more positive engagement with Africa and colonization. Along with the Reverend Horace Waller and also France’s Cardinal Charles Lavigerie, Allen led a militant campaign against Mohammedanism and in favor of colonial trading companies. The Society drew closer to the Foreign Office, where the slave trade department had been reorganized as an Africa Department, and called for more Consuls across that continent.

Keywords:   Arab slave trade, Islam, Africa, Colonialism, Imperialism

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