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The Bible in American Life$
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Philip Goff, Arthur Farnsley, and Peter Thuesen

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190468910

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190468910.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 October 2019

Readers and Their E-Bibles

Readers and Their E-Bibles

The Shape and Authority of the Hypertext Canon

Chapter:
(p.256) 21 Readers and Their E-Bibles
Source:
The Bible in American Life
Author(s):

Bryan Bibb

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190468910.003.0021

The current shift from codex to screen will be every bit as decisive as the historic shift from scroll to codex in the Greco-Roman world or the shift from hand-lettered to printed manuscripts in the late Middle Ages. Two developments in biblical reading that may result in particular from the use of electronic Bibles are (1) unparalleled access to competing translations, and (2) shifting functional definitions of the biblical “canon.” The definition and nature of “the Bible” will shift as people increasingly encounter the text outside the physical boundaries of the printed volume. Electronic platforms have the potential to destabilize traditional notions of what the Bible is and how it functions. It is not certain, however, that these changes will lead to more interpretive sophistication or biblical literacy among nonexpert readers. Electronic platforms may actually reinforce and empower existing assumptions about the biblical text and canon.

Keywords:   canon, translation, paratext, hermeneutics, e-Bible, digital Bible

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