Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Bible in American Life$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Philip Goff, Arthur Farnsley, and Peter Thuesen

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190468910

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190468910.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 August 2019

The Bible in American Life Today

The Bible in American Life Today

Chapter:
(p.5) 1 The Bible in American Life Today
Source:
The Bible in American Life
Author(s):

Philip Goff

Arthur E. Farnsley

Peter J. Thuesen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190468910.003.0001

This chapter captures the major findings of the national survey of Americans’ use of the Bible in daily life and lays the foundation for the volume. Forty-eight percent of Americans read the Bible in the past year, 9 percent daily. Despite the proliferation of translations, the King James Version is Bible readers’ top choice by far. The strongest correlation with Bible reading is race; African Americans read the Bible at considerably higher rates than others. Bible readers consult scripture for personal prayer and devotion three times more than for learning about culture war issues such as abortion, homosexuality, war, or poverty. Clear differences exist among Bible readers consulting scripture for specific reasons; age, income, and education are key factors. Differences among religious traditions follow predictably the historic divides between Protestants and Catholics, and between white conservative and white moderate/liberal Protestants. However, reading practices defy some stereotypes about certain groups.

Keywords:   Bible, Bible reading, Bible versions, race and religion, demographics, culture wars

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .