Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
New Directions in Law and Literature$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Elizabeth S. Anker and Bernadette Meyler

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190456368

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190456368.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 August 2019

Pluralism, Religion, and Democratic Culture

Pluralism, Religion, and Democratic Culture

Nadeem Aslam’s Maps for Lost Lovers

Chapter:
(p.279) Chapter 16 Pluralism, Religion, and Democratic Culture
Source:
New Directions in Law and Literature
Author(s):

Elliott Visconsi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190456368.003.0017

This article locates Nadeem Aslam’s 2004 novel Maps for Lost Lovers within a European politico-legal argument about religious free expression under Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights, demonstrating the novel’s engagement with the norms and lived experience of democratic pluralism under pressure. Maps for Lost Lovers is an intervention into the public argument about pluralism and assimilation in the United Kingdom, a narrative that illuminates the prescriptive regimes and structuring epiphenomena of law in post-9/11 Britain. Maps is an agenda-setting narrativization of a legal regime, and specifically a richly textured and individuated account the failures of democratic pluralism and social relations within an incompletely secularized polity. Like Aslam’s other fiction, Maps for Lost Lovers seeks to cultivate those habits of thought that can lead to collective engagement and political change.

Keywords:   pluralism, secularism, fiction, Nadeem Aslam, Britain, Article 9, religious free expression, Europe, immigration, identity and belonging

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .