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After CritiqueTwenty-First-Century Fiction in a Neoliberal Age$
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Mitchum Huehls

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190456221

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190456221.001.0001

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Accounting 101

Accounting 101

Reading the Exomodern

Chapter:
(p.159) Coda Accounting 101
Source:
After Critique
Author(s):

Mitchum Huehls

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190456221.003.0006

The coda looks at the nature of accounting in David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King to describe a post-symptomatic reading method that shares contemporary literature’s more ontological commitments. I argue here that the current methodological debate about reading has taken place in dangerous isolation from contemporary literature’s own reconsideration of how literary meaning and value might be produced. If texts are themselves shunning standard representational forms and instead producing value ontologically, then reading symptomatically does a disservice to the text. In that regard, the turn away from critique that I observe in contemporary fiction goes hand-in-hand with contemporary post-critical, anti-symptomatic forms of reading.

Keywords:   surface reading, symptomatic reading, David Foster Wallace, post-critical interpretation, metafiction, exomodernism

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