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After CritiqueTwenty-First-Century Fiction in a Neoliberal Age$
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Mitchum Huehls

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190456221

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190456221.001.0001

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Welcoming the World

Welcoming the World

Post-Ecological Fiction

Chapter:
(p.129) 4 Welcoming the World
Source:
After Critique
Author(s):

Mitchum Huehls

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190456221.003.0005

Highlighting neoliberalism’s simultaneous capture of environmental sustainability and deep ecology, this chapter looks at recent environmental literature and identifies a strong posthuman ecology that might transform neoliberalism from within. Mat Johnson’s Pym gets things started with yet another novel reluctant to critique, a novel that instead highlights new forms for engaging neoliberalism’s callous exploitation of our environment. In Kim Stanley Robinson’s Antarctica, that form proves to be science, which Robinson advocates as a way of speaking for the world without imposing human interest, subjectivity, or perspective on it. Finally, Tom McCarthy’s Remainder shows us that science is not the only way to welcome the world. Literary fiction can too when it opens itself up to non-identity, to the entire universe of things and the shared oblivion toward which they tend.

Keywords:   ecology, science, irony, sustainability, posthumanism

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