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The Purse and the SwordThe Trials of Israel's Legal Revolution$
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Daniel Friedmann

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190278502

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190278502.001.0001

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Snail-Paced Justice

Snail-Paced Justice

Chapter:
(p.325) 34 Snail-Paced Justice
Source:
The Purse and the Sword
Author(s):

Daniel Friedmann

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190278502.003.0034

This chapter briefly details the crisis faced by the court. The Judicial Selection Committee was rendered dysfunctional by the dispute between minister of justice Tzipi Livni and chief justice Aharon Barak over the appointment of Ruth Gavison. Consequently when Barak retired, five seats on the Supreme Court were vacant as well as numerous seats on lower courts. In addition, the legal system itself had difficulties functioning. The Supreme Court’s position that “all is justiciable,” coupled with the production of lengthy and arcane tangents on social and moral theory considerably slowed the judicial process. Difficult problems arose in the lower courts as well, and the author decided to create a new District Court for the country’s central region that would relieve the Tel Aviv court of close to half of its caseload. Fortunately, the establishment of new courts falls under the purview of the justice minister.

Keywords:   court crisis, Judicial Selection Committee, Israeli legal system, Israeli Supreme Court, Israeli District Courts, new courts, Israeli ministry of justice

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