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The Purse and the SwordThe Trials of Israel's Legal Revolution$
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Daniel Friedmann

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190278502

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190278502.001.0001

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Appointments to the Supreme Court

Appointments to the Supreme Court

Chapter:
(p.197) 23 Appointments to the Supreme Court
Source:
The Purse and the Sword
Author(s):

Daniel Friedmann

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190278502.003.0023

This chapter discusses the appointments of twelve justices during Aharon Barak’s eleven-year tenure as chief justice. Eleven of these candidates were proposed by the court itself. Only one candidate, Edmond Levy, was proposed by the minister of justice during this period. Even though the law stipulated that sitting Supreme Court justices were a minority on the Judicial Selection Committee, in practice the court’s sitting justices—all of them, not just the three who were officially members of the committee—served as a de facto nominating board that for all practical purposes usurped the power of the statutory committee. As ministers of justice came and went at a rapid pace, and since most of them deferred to the court, the justices were able to maneuver the nominating process in a way that allowed them to determine, in almost every case, who their colleagues would be.

Keywords:   judicial appointments, Judicial Selection Committee, nominating process, Aharon Barak, Dorit Beinisch, Supreme Court justices, appointment process

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