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Abraham's DiceChance and Providence in the Monotheistic Traditions$
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Karl W. Giberson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190277154

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190277154.001.0001

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The Natural Science of Greek Philosophy and the Social Science of Judaism Become the Super-Providence of Paul

The Natural Science of Greek Philosophy and the Social Science of Judaism Become the Super-Providence of Paul

Chapter:
(p.84) 5 The Natural Science of Greek Philosophy and the Social Science of Judaism Become the Super-Providence of Paul
Source:
Abraham's Dice
Author(s):

Sarah Ruden

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190277154.003.0005

Paul of Tarsus represents a major break in thinking about determinism. Paul inherited two traditions, Greek philosophy and Jewish scriptural law, that treated determinism and self-determination similarly in outline; both posited tight nets of preset causality built into the universe, but both insisted that through detailed knowledge, an individual could control his own fate in the ways that counted most. Though, ironically, often using the language of these schemas, Paul exploded both by teaching of a super-providence of salvation, achieved mysteriously and counterintuitively through the crucifixion and resurrection of Christ, which relegated all concern for the details of fate to God.

Keywords:   St. Paul, super-providence, incarnation, salvation, resurrection, classical worldview

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