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Abraham's DiceChance and Providence in the Monotheistic Traditions$
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Karl W. Giberson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190277154

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190277154.001.0001

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Darwinian Evolution and a Providential God

Darwinian Evolution and a Providential God

The Human Problem

Chapter:
(p.310) 15 Darwinian Evolution and a Providential God
Source:
Abraham's Dice
Author(s):

Michael Ruse

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190277154.003.0015

God can do as he likes. He can create a world and make humans special in that world. But God cannot make 2 + 2 = 5 or make an elephant that jumps like a cat. Decisions made constrain decisions to be made. If God has chosen to create through the lawful processes of evolution, as science makes clear, how can God be sure to get human beings? Are we here, as Stephen Jay Gould used to say, because of “our lucky stars” (rather than the direct creation by God)? Virtually all evolutionary biologists agree with Gould that evolution is “random” in some important senses. Reconciling this randomness with the idea that God is the creator has proven challenging, and no solutions to date are adequate. A new approach is needed.

Keywords:   theistic evolution, randomness, evolution, purpose, evolutionary biology, Gould, convergence, contingency, natural evil

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