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GatekeepersThe Emergence of World Literature and the 1960s$
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William Marling

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190274146

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190274146.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Writers, Gatekeepers, Publishing, and History

Chapter:
(p.143) Conclusion
Source:
Gatekeepers
Author(s):

William Marling

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190274146.003.0006

Writers, gatekeepers, translation, and publishing have changed dramatically since the 1960s. Five large Anglo-American publishers control most of the world’s literature in translation, as Albert Greco shows, and have created a genre called World Literature, inflected by magic realism. James English argues that the “prize system” buttresses this system, and book reviewers such as at the New York Times (for example, Michiko Kakutani) and at the New Yorker (John Updike) have long reinforced the genre by making sure that not many too “foreign” or translated books get reviewed. Although literature in translation is still published by smaller presses and reviewed, it probably won’t enter the mainstream again until it is needed due to history.

Keywords:   Publishing industry, reviewing process, literature in translation, Michiko Kakutani, John Updike, New York Times, Amazon, MFA programs, opportunity cost, franchise

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