Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Global Community Yearbook of International Law and Jurisprudence 2014Volume I$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Giuliana Ziccardi Capaldo

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780190270513

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190270513.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 30 March 2020

The Crisis of the “Responsibility to Protect” Doctrine in the Light of the Syrian Civil War

The Crisis of the “Responsibility to Protect” Doctrine in the Light of the Syrian Civil War

Chapter:
(p.103) The Crisis of the “Responsibility to Protect” Doctrine in the Light of the Syrian Civil War
Source:
The Global Community Yearbook of International Law and Jurisprudence 2014
Author(s):

Ilja Richard Pavone

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190270513.003.0005

Resolution 2118 on chemical disarmament in Syria broke the diplomatic impasse over Syria within the Security Council (SC). Its adoption has been celebrated as the victory of multilateralism over unilateralism, averting the threat of military intervention. However, Resolution 2118 was not adopted within Chapter VII of the UN Charter and neither contains reference to the responsibility to protect (R2P) principle. Therefore, the Syrian issue will be considered a “paradigm” of the turning point of R2P. In this regard, this chapter discusses why the international community reacted in a dissimilar way to the Libyan and Syrian civil wars and what is the impact of this discrepancy on the legal status of R2P. The article discusses the current practice of R2P, arguing that its future should take the form of an informal commitment by the five permanent members not to wield their veto power in cases of gross violations of human rights.

Keywords:   human rights violations, responsibility not to veto, responsibility to protect, Syrian civil war, use force

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .