Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Does Torture Work?$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

John W. Schiemann

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780190262365

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190262365.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 May 2019

Interrogating Torture

Interrogating Torture

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Interrogating Torture
Source:
Does Torture Work?
Author(s):

John W. Schiemann

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190262365.003.0001

Chapter 1 opens with the 2002 capture, rendition, and interrogation of Abu Zubaydah, thought by the CIA to be a high-ranking member of Al Qaeda. Controversy about the Zubaydah case illustrates the questions motivating the book. Does interrogational torture work? What is meant by “work”? How good does the information have to be for torture to “work”? How often must it provide good information to be considered effective? What is the price of this degree of effectiveness? How frequently must torture be used to achieve it? How harsh must the torture be? Will innocent detainees be tortured or only guilty ones? After establishing the political and normative importance of these questions, this chapter introduces the reader to game theory and anticipates some objections to using it before providing a roadmap through the argument and book. This chapter and those following end with a summary of where the argument stands.

Keywords:   Abu Zubaydah, Al Qaeda, interrogational torture, CIA, effectiveness, game theory

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .