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When Bad Policy Makes Good PoliticsRunning the Numbers on Health Reform$
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Robert P. Saldin

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190255435

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190255435.001.0001

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CLASS on Capitol Hill, Part 1

CLASS on Capitol Hill, Part 1

Dodging Committee Jurisdiction and the Number Crunchers

Chapter:
(p.71) 5 CLASS on Capitol Hill, Part 1
Source:
When Bad Policy Makes Good Politics
Author(s):

Robert P. Saldin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190255435.003.0005

This chapter follows CLASS through the initial stages of the 2009–2010 health reform process. That process coalesced around three pieces of legislation forged in congressional committees holding jurisdiction over health care. The small but well-placed band of supporters of CLASS in the Senate and House worked hard to evade the two “money committees” with expertise in and responsibility for overseeing programs like CLASS because those committees were opposed to it. At the same time, another key process involved several agencies weighing in on CLASS with actuarial assessments. Those evaluations indicated that CLASS had a serious problem: its design would lead to debilitating adverse selection that would render it unworkable.

Keywords:   congressional committees, House Committee on Energy and Commerce, Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Congressional Budget Office, adverse selection, Judd Gregg

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