Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Hidden Lives, Public PersonaeWomen and Civic Life in the Roman West$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Emily Hemelrijk

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780190251888

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190251888.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 06 July 2020

A World Full of Cities

A World Full of Cities

Chapter:
(p.7) Chapter 1 A World Full of Cities
Source:
Hidden Lives, Public Personae
Author(s):

Emily A. Hemelrijk

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190251888.003.0002

This chapter discusses women’s social and legal position within Roman cities and the possible influence of Romanization on their integration into civic life. Further, it discusses the main profits and pitfalls of the epigraphic evidence and the blurred distinction between public and private in Roman society. Special attention is paid to the tension between gender and social status, the definition of the Roman elite as a political order (the senatorial, equestrian, and decurial) or economic class, and the relation between gender and Romanization. The concentration of the evidence for women’s civic roles in the Mediterranean regions is discussed in the light of the epigraphic habit. It is concluded that Roman citizenship and civil law (especially Roman laws of marriage and inheritance), and the resulting financial capacity of wealthy women, were partly responsible for women’s participation in civic life.

Keywords:   matrona, romanization, urbanization, epigraphic habit, elite orders, roman citizenship, roman marriage, ius trium liberorum

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .