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States in DisguiseCauses of State Support for Rebel Groups$
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Belgin San-Akca

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190250881

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190250881.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Main Trends in State Support of Nonstate Armed Groups

Chapter:
(p.138) 6 Conclusion
Source:
States in Disguise
Author(s):

Belgin San-Akca

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190250881.003.0006

This chapter presents the major findings of the data and discusses the policy implications for counterterrorism and counterinsurgency. It starts with major trends in the variables, with respect to supporter-target interactions, supporter-rebel group interactions, and supporter-specific attributes. It summarizes findings for the hypothesized mechanisms of the state-rebel selection theory. While states are driven to support rebels largely out of material motives, rebels are more likely to seek support from states with which they share ideational ties. Addressing the root causes of external state support, then, requires breaking the ideational networks between states and rebel groups. As a countermeasure, interstate ideational networks should be strengthened. Finally, this chapter discusses future avenues of research on the topic.

Keywords:   Ideational ties, Interstate ideational networks, Counterterrorism, Counterinsurgency, External state support

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