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The Papacy and the OrthodoxSources and History of a Debate$
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A. Edward Siecienski

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190245252

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190245252.001.0001

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Peter in the Exegesis of the Fathers

Peter in the Exegesis of the Fathers

Chapter:
(p.99) 3 Peter in the Exegesis of the Fathers
Source:
The Papacy and the Orthodox
Author(s):

A. Edward Siecienski

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190245252.003.0004

This chapter discusses how the fathers, East and West, read and commented upon the scriptural material concerning Peter and the post-biblical memory of his ministry in Rome. The fathers employed the person of Peter for a variety of homiletical and pastoral purposes—praising or chiding him without necessarily thinking that they were somehow commenting on the powers or privileges of the Bishop of Rome. This changed during the polemical battles of the Middle Ages, when focus shifted almost exclusively to the fathers’ commentaries on those texts allegedly granting Peter his unique ministry. Forgotten was the far more complex, and far more interesting, portrait of Peter that emerged from the fathers’ writings on both the man and his mission in the early church.

Keywords:   Simon Peter, Origin of Alexandria, Tertullian, Cyprian of Carthage, Augustine of Hippo, John Chrysostom, Leo the Great, Gregory the Great

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