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The James Bond SongsPop Anthems of Late Capitalism$
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Adrian Daub and Charles Kronengold

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780190234522

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190234522.001.0001

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“We’re an All Time High”

“We’re an All Time High”

James Bond, Pop, and the Endless 1970s

Chapter:
(p.115) 5 “We’re an All Time High”
Source:
The James Bond Songs
Author(s):

Adrian Daub

Charles Kronengold

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190234522.003.0006

1977’s “Nobody Does It Better” took a strange angle on the Bond-song. Carly Simon addresses Bond as the object of a monogamous love affair; the sound connects more with contemporary styles than with Bond-song tradition. The song becomes an ordinary love-ballad. And it sells like crazy, which provokes the next four Bond-songs to lock into its late-70s musical approach. Two of these songs, Sheena Easton’s “For Your Eyes Only” and Rita Coolidge’s “All Time High,” are big sellers in their own right, despite their half-baked lyrics, which make little concession to the world of the James Bond films. What does it mean when Bond-songs no longer sound like Bond-songs? And having hit on this new and successful formula—singing love-ballads to James Bond—why didn’t the franchise stay with it?

Keywords:   1970s pop music, adult contemporary, Rita Coolidge, Sheena Easton, Carly Simon

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