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The Myth of Mob RuleViolent Crime and Democratic Politics$
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Lisa L. Miller

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190228705

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190228705.001.0001

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Security from Violence as a Collective Good

Security from Violence as a Collective Good

Chapter:
(p.27) Chapter 2. Security from Violence as a Collective Good
Source:
The Myth of Mob Rule
Author(s):

Lisa L. Miller

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190228705.003.0002

This chapter details the importance of reconsidering the role of violence in the politics of crime and punishment. Violence is a serious social problem with corrosive consequences, both individually and collaterally, and protection from random violence is a core promise of government. This chapter illustrates how the lack of attention to violence has led to several problems in the literature, including an over-reliance on the US case for generalizing about the politics of crime and punishment and a limited recognition of its outlier status with respect to lethal violence; problems of endogeneity with respect to the relationship between low rates of punishing and low rates of violence within particular democratic systems; and the neglect of the political interests of populations most exposed to rising rates of crime and insecurity over the last 50 years.

Keywords:   violence, crime, security, public good, endogeneity

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