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Aquinas's Way to GodThe Proof in De Ente et Essentia$
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Gaven Kerr

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780190224806

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190224806.001.0001

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Esse Tantum

Esse Tantum

Chapter:
(p.150) 6 Esse Tantum
Source:
Aquinas's Way to God
Author(s):

OP Gaven Kerr

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190224806.003.0006

In this chapter the notion of God as esse tantum is explored. It first of all highlights some important aspects of the nature of esse tantum, and then proceeds to defuse several objections to this conception of God. The first is that of Anthony Kenny to the effect that esse tantum is an absurd notion; the second is that of Alvin Plantinga, who holds that such a conception of God could not be a personal God. In both cases it is argued that the objections are either false or misconstrued. The chapter then changes track and considers whether or not this conception of God reflects something of humanity’s experience of God, especially within the Christian tradition to which Aquinas contributed. It concludes that such a conception of God can be taken to be the God that many throughout history have loved and worshipped.

Keywords:   God, Kenny, Plantinga, Yahweh, worship

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