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The Shuberts and Their Passing ShowsThe Untold Tale of Ziegfeld's Rivals$
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Jonas Westover

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780190219239

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190219239.001.0001

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A Sure Cure for the Blues

A Sure Cure for the Blues

Creating The Passing Show of 1914

Chapter:
(p.151) 6 A Sure Cure for the Blues
Source:
The Shuberts and Their Passing Shows
Author(s):

Jonas Westover

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190219239.003.0007

Although revues today are known for having no narrative whatsoever, during this era, a script that included recurring characters and a threadbare plot was standard. This chapter looks at Harold Atteridge’s creative process in writing the script and developing the overarching structure for the shows, with an emphasis on the 1914 edition. The use of specific characters, scenes, and songs were carefully ordered to create a sense of motion and flow that made the revue work on stage. Some of Atteridge’s inspirations are considered, using multiple drafts of scenarios and scripts to understand how the writing process unfolded. The reception of the show and its impact on opening night, as well as what critics thought of the final product, is also included.

Keywords:   narrative, script, writing process, genesis, influences, drafts, cast changes, 1914

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