Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Saussure's Philosophy of Language as PhenomenologyUndoing the Doctrine of the Course in General Linguistics$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Beata Stawarska

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780190213022

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190213022.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 November 2019

Saussure’s general linguistics as linguistic phenomenology

Saussure’s general linguistics as linguistic phenomenology

Chapter:
(p.120) 5 Saussure’s general linguistics as linguistic phenomenology
Source:
Saussure's Philosophy of Language as Phenomenology
Author(s):

Beata Stawarska

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190213022.003.0006

This chapter challenges the dominant structuralist reading of Saussure by resituating his project within its historical context and documenting the formative influence of the Polish theoretical linguists Baudouin de Courtneay and Mikolaj Kruszewski, whose idea was to develop “something like a phenomenology of language.” It traces the phenomenological impetus in Saussure’s autographed writings, populated as they are with references to the phenomenon, the speaking subject, language acts, and consciousness, and shows that this influence is largely effaced within the edited version of the Course. It draws on materials from Saussure’s Nachlass to make the case for a consciousness structured like a language, with a focus on linguistic innovation by analogy. The chapter suggests abandoning the official doctrine associated with Saussure’s general linguistics, considering that the distinctions between la langue and la parole, and synchrony and diachrony, were drawn within the ongoing process of analogical innovation, without opposition or hierarchy.

Keywords:   Baudouin de Courtneay, Mikolaj Kruszewski, linguistic phenomenology, analogy, linguistic innovation, la langue, la parole, synchrony, diachrony, Saussure’s Nachlass

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .