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Beyond Functional SequenceThe Cartography of Syntactic Structures, Volume 10$
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Ur Shlonsky

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780190210588

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190210588.001.0001

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Two ReasonPs: What Are*(n’t) You Coming to the United States For?

Two ReasonPs: What Are*(n’t) You Coming to the United States For?

Chapter:
(p.220) 11 Two ReasonPs: What Are*(n’t) You Coming to the United States For?
Source:
Beyond Functional Sequence
Author(s):

Yoshio Endo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190210588.003.0012

This paper discusses the nature of ReasonP proposed by Shlonsky and Soare (2011) with special attention to Criterial Freezing proposed by Rizzi (2006). It will be shown that there are two types of ReasonP, one of which is lower than Neg and the other of which is higher than Neg. ReasonP1 (high) is occupied by why in English and ReasonP2 is occupied by the expression what of the what-for pair in English and what-Acc in other languages. In addition, we will see that movement from ReasonP1 and ReasonP2 targets different IntPs. Finally, we will see two other syntactic positions of the wh-elements to ask for reason how come and why the hell. I suggest that these four wh-elements to ask for reason how come and why the hell. I suggest that these four wh-elements to ask for reason have the following configuration: [IntP1 why the hell [Int’ how come . . . [ReasonP1 whywhat-for.

Keywords:   criterial Freezing, reasonP, int(errogative)P, negative islands, typology

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