Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Affix Ordering Across Languages and Frameworks$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Stela Manova

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780190210434

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190210434.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 08 December 2019

Reduplication, Repetition, Hypercharacterization, and Other Affix-Doubling in Child Language

Reduplication, Repetition, Hypercharacterization, and Other Affix-Doubling in Child Language

Chapter:
(p.259) 11 Reduplication, Repetition, Hypercharacterization, and Other Affix-Doubling in Child Language
Source:
Affix Ordering Across Languages and Frameworks
Author(s):

Wolfgang U. Dressler

Katarzyna Dziubalska-Kołaczyk

Natalia Gagarina

Marianne Kilani-Schoch

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190210434.003.0011

Reduplication, hypercharacterization of a prototypically less productive suffix by a productive suffix and diminutive suffix doubling, are special, repetitive cases of affix order. Repetition may be total or partial, moreover, both in form and meaning or only in meaning; it may be divided into several subtypes, such as traditional versus innovative onomatopoetic repetitions and repetitions of specific suffixes, especially of diminutive and plural formation. The course of early language acquisition may shed light on general questions of affix order and recursivity, particularly because early repetitive operations can be understood as trainings for morphological (de)composition and thus also for affix stacking. The data are mainly German, Russian, Polish, and French, which come from the Cross-Linguistic Project on Pre- and Protomorphology in Language Acquisition.

Keywords:   reduplication, repetition, hypercharacterization, suffix doubling, child language, recursivity

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .