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CharacterNew Directions from Philosophy, Psychology, and Theology$
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Christian B. Miller, R. Michael Furr, Angela Knobel, and William Fleeson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780190204600

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190204600.001.0001

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Moving Character beyond the Person-Situation Debate

Moving Character beyond the Person-Situation Debate

The Stable and Dynamic Nature of Virtues in Everyday Life

Chapter:
(p.129) 5 Moving Character beyond the Person-Situation Debate
Source:
Character
Author(s):

Wiebke Bleidorn

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190204600.003.0006

Chapter 5 engages with the situationist debate in social psychology and takes a fresh look at the degree and meaning of consistency of character traits. Specifically, it proposes (i) that there is more than one type of behavioral consistency relevant to character traits, (ii) that character traits can be described as density distributions of virtue states, and (iii) that people flexibly adapt their virtue states to their current role context. The theoretical and empirical background for these claims is discussed in view of recent findings of the project “Loving Mum and Tough Career Girl,” which examined virtuous behavior in working parents’ daily lives.

Keywords:   trait, state, virtue, character, personality, experience-sampling, social role

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