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Living Standards in the PastNew Perspectives on Well-Being in Asia and Europe$
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Robert C. Allen, Tommy Bengtsson, and Martin Dribe

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199280681

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2005

DOI: 10.1093/0199280681.001.0001

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Maternal Mortality as an Indicator of the Standard of Living in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Slavonia

Maternal Mortality as an Indicator of the Standard of Living in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Slavonia

Chapter:
(p.277) 11 Maternal Mortality as an Indicator of the Standard of Living in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Slavonia
Source:
Living Standards in the Past
Author(s):

Eugene A. Hammel

Aaron Gullickson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199280681.003.0012

This study of maternal mortality on the Croatian-Bosnian border in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries shows that the chance of death in childbirth was sensitive to major changes in the social and economic system. Death was more likely when men were called to military duty, in military rather than civil parishes even in peacetime, and over time as wage labour increased and as economies of scale were lost as the joint household system decayed. The unifying factor in all of these influences is the withdrawal of male labour from family farming, placing greater burdens on pregnant and parturient women and on those other women who might nurture them.

Keywords:   Croatia, family systems, household economy, kinship support, maternal mortality, monetization

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