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Living Standards in the PastNew Perspectives on Well-Being in Asia and Europe$
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Robert C. Allen, Tommy Bengtsson, and Martin Dribe

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199280681

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2005

DOI: 10.1093/0199280681.001.0001

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The Burden of Grandeur: Physical and Economic Well-Being of the Russian Population in the Eighteenth Century

The Burden of Grandeur: Physical and Economic Well-Being of the Russian Population in the Eighteenth Century

Chapter:
(p.255) 10 The Burden of Grandeur: Physical and Economic Well-Being of the Russian Population in the Eighteenth Century
Source:
Living Standards in the Past
Author(s):

Boris Mironov

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199280681.003.0011

From 1700-1704 to 1795-1799 the average stature of Russian recruits decreased from 164.7 to 159.5 cm. It means that the eighteenth century is noted for the fall in the biological status of the Russian population. The decrease occurred against the background of a considerable economic growth and was caused not by economic depression but by the rise in taxes and obligations. Increase in payments to the state was linked with the wars Russia waged for outlets to the Baltic and Black seas, and for the status of a great power, and with reforms carried out by the supreme power catching up with the West European countries.

Keywords:   eighteenth century, anthropometrics, biological status, economic growth, obligations, Russia, taxes

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