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Social Mobility in Europe$
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Richard Breen

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199258451

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2004

DOI: 10.1093/0199258457.001.0001

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Recent Trends in Intergenerational Occupational Class Reproduction in the Netherlands 1970–99

Recent Trends in Intergenerational Occupational Class Reproduction in the Netherlands 1970–99

Chapter:
(p.345) 14 Recent Trends in Intergenerational Occupational Class Reproduction in the Netherlands 1970–99
Source:
Social Mobility in Europe
Author(s):

Harry B. G. Ganzeboom

Ruud Luijkx

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199258457.003.0014

The Netherlands has moved from being a comparatively closed society in the 1950s towards a relatively open one around 2000. Analysing occupational class mobility for men and for women in the labour force between 1970 and 1999 on the basis of 35 surveys, a clear downward trend in total social reproduction is found for men (–1.6% per year) and for women (–1.1%). No convincing evidence of a trend reversal has been found. This general trend towards more social fluidity is also replicated in the partial analysis, where the trends towards more openness do not only apply to the ascriptive parts of the status attainment patterns (fathers promoting their children’s educational and occupational outcomes directly), but also to the achievement part (the partial association between education and occupation). The last finding contradicts common theories. A possible explanation is that, over time, educational credentials have lost some of their discriminatory power.

Keywords:   educational attainment, scaled association models, social fluidity, social mobility, status attainment, the Netherlands, uniform difference models

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