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The Globalizing Learning Economy$
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Daniele Archibugi and Bengt-Åke Lundvall

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780199258178

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0199258171.001.0001

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The Globalization of Technology and National Policies

The Globalization of Technology and National Policies

Chapter:
(p.111) 6 The Globalization of Technology and National Policies
Source:
The Globalizing Learning Economy
Author(s):

Daniele Archibugi

Simona Iammarino

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199258171.003.0007

In the last few years, many heterogeneous phenomena have been put together under the label ‘technological globalization’ and the concept has thus lost much of its original clarity. This chapter aims to identify three different categories that compose the globalization of technology, with a view to understanding what the impact of each is on national economies, and what public policies can do to exploit the available technological knowledge for welfare and growth. The first section analyses the effects of globalization of innovation for single nations according to a taxonomy that breaks down into three categories: the international exploitation of technology, the global generation of innovations, and global technical collaborations. The next section explores the implications of each of these three typologies of the globalization of technology for public policies, and suggests that no single strategy can be used to address all three globalization processes. However, contrary to what is held to be the dominant laissez‐faire view, it is argued that the dynamics of globalization need a more active role of governments and a much broader battery of public policy instruments to allow national economies to exploit the available opportunities.

Keywords:   collaboration, economic policy, globalization, impact, innovation, national economies, technology

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