Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Citizenship and Education in Liberal-Democratic SocietiesTeaching for Cosmopolitan Values and Collective Identities$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kevin McDonough and Walter Feinberg

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780199253661

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2005

DOI: 10.1093/0199253668.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 September 2019

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION IN LIBERAL DEMOCRATIC SOCIETIES: THE QUESTION OF ACCOUNTABILITY AND AUTONOMY

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION IN LIBERAL DEMOCRATIC SOCIETIES: THE QUESTION OF ACCOUNTABILITY AND AUTONOMY

Chapter:
(p.385) CHAPTER 14 RELIGIOUS EDUCATION IN LIBERAL DEMOCRATIC SOCIETIES: THE QUESTION OF ACCOUNTABILITY AND AUTONOMY
Source:
Citizenship and Education in Liberal-Democratic Societies
Author(s):

Walter Feinberg (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199253668.003.0015

The essays in Part III of the book, on liberal constraints and traditionalist education, argue for a more regulatory conception of liberal education and emphasize the need for some controls over cultural and religious educational authority. Walter Feinberg’s essay, on religious education in liberal–democratic societies in relation to the question of accountability and autonomy, takes up the issue of educational constraints with respect to religious schools in such societies. While he allows that religious education need not be inconsistent with liberal goals, and can find reasons why some liberal societies feel it appropriate to provide public support for religious schools, he argues that certain conditions can render such support tyrannical and unwise. He concludes that if the conditions are appropriate for public support of religious schools, then there should also be significant public control. After an introduction in Section 14.1, the chapter has six further sections: Section 14.2 discusses some of the potential lines of conflict between religious liberal education and public (common) education; Section 14.3 examines a number of arguments that have been advanced in support of public funding for religious schools; Section 14.4 looks at a potentially fundamental reason for denying public funding for religious schools – that it would be tyrannical to take tax funds from one believer in order to advance the beliefs of another – and the implications as regards the First Amendment to the United States Constitution; both Sections 14.4 and 14.5 suggest some of the conditions that need to be satisfied in order to supply this funding – primarily that it must be predicated on the school advancing individual and social autonomy; Section 14.6 briefly suggests what such an arrangement might entail for the traditional way in which the public/private divide is conceived; Section 14.7 concludes.

Keywords:   accountability, autonomy, common education, cultural authority, educational authority, individual autonomy, liberal education, liberal–democratic societies, liberalism, public control, public education, public funding, public/private divide, religious authority, religious education, religious liberal education, religious schools, social autonomy, traditionalist education, United States, United States Constitution

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .