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Social Movements and NetworksRelational Approaches to Collective Action$
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Mario Diani and Doug McAdam

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780199251780

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0199251789.001.0001

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Contentious Connections in Great Britain, 1828–34

Contentious Connections in Great Britain, 1828–34

Chapter:
(p.147) 7 Contentious Connections in Great Britain, 1828–34
Source:
Social Movements and Networks
Author(s):

Charles Tilly

Lesley J. Wood

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199251789.003.0007

Combines network analysis and historical sociology to chart significant changes in patterns of social conflict (in particular, relationships of attack and claim making) among different social groups, including royalty, parliament, local and national officials, trade, and workers, in Britain in the early nineteenth century. Building block models based on the intersection of actors and events, the authors map networks of contention in national politics before and after the passing of the 1832 Reform Act, which increased the centrality of parliament in British politics. They highlight the process by which people, through collective action, not only create new forms of political repertoires but also forge relations to other actors, both at the local and the national level.

Keywords:   block models, Britain, claim making, collective action, contention, historical sociology, national politics, nineteenth century, political repertoires, social movements

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