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Order and Justice in International Relations$
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Rosemary Foot, John Gaddis, and Andrew Hurrell

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780199251209

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0199251207.001.0001

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Order versus Justice: An American Foreign Policy Dilemma

Order versus Justice: An American Foreign Policy Dilemma

Chapter:
(p.155) 6 Order versus Justice: An American Foreign Policy Dilemma
Source:
Order and Justice in International Relations
Author(s):

John Lewis Gaddis (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199251207.003.0007

Gaddis primarily focuses on US dilemmas over the relationship between order and justice throughout the twentieth century. He argues that from the time of Theodore Roosevelt to that of Richard M. Nixon, a concern for order had superseded a concern for justice. After that time, and especially in the post‐Cold War era, these two concepts were finally to be brought together in ways that could be said to have been destabilizing world order. Nevertheless, once entwined, it has been difficult for the US to disentangle the promotion of order from justice even during its post‐September 11th struggle against terrorism. In order for the US to be successful in the promotion of its order and justice agenda, the author concludes that US hegemony needs to be coupled with legitimacy, consent, and a modesty of aims.

Keywords:   consent, international justice, international order, legitimacy, post‐Cold War era, terrorism, US hegemony, USA

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