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The IncarnationAn Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Incarnation of the Son of God$
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Stephen T. Davis, Daniel Kendall SJ, and Gerald O'Collins SJ

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780199248452

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0199248451.001.0001

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The Incarnation in Twentieth‐Century Art

The Incarnation in Twentieth‐Century Art

Chapter:
(p.332) 15 The Incarnation in Twentieth‐Century Art
Source:
The Incarnation
Author(s):

David Brown (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199248451.003.0015

David Brown discusses how the humanity and divinity of Christ have been presented in twentieth‐century art. Some representative artists are examined: for painting, Bacon, Chagall, Dali, Ernst, Magritte, O’Keeffe, Picasso, Rouault, Spencer, and Warhol; for sculpture, Epstein, Gill, and Moore. Brown concludes not only that the religious and incarnational impulse in modern art is healthier than is commonly supposed, but also that certain non‐Christians have been highly effective in conveying the truth of a doctrine in which they themselves do not believe. Even where this is not so, sometimes the implicit critique that they offer still requires careful consideration on the part of Christian believers. Brown also notes the wide range of means that have been employed to indicate divinity.

Keywords:   Brown, Divinity in art, twentieth‐century art

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