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Political Choice in Britain$
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Harold D. Clarke, David Sanders, Marianne C. Stewart, and Paul Whiteley

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199244881

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2004

DOI: 10.1093/019924488X.001.0001

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Electoral Choice in 2001

Electoral Choice in 2001

Chapter:
(p.79) FOUR Electoral Choice in 2001
Source:
Political Choice in Britain
Author(s):

Harold D. Clarke (Contributor Webpage)

David Sanders (Contributor Webpage)

Marianne C. Stewart (Contributor Webpage)

Paul Whiteley (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/019924488X.003.0004

Investigates the sources of party support in 2001. The analyses specify a series of multivariate models that capture the effects of the key variables from each of the sociological and individual rationality frameworks. Party identification, leader images, issue proximities, and party performance evaluations on the economy and other important policy areas combine to exercise sizeable effects on vote choice. Tactical voting is also evident, benefiting the Liberal Democrats at the expense of Labour and the Conservatives. In contrast to many earlier studies of British electoral politics, we make strong claims about the effects of evaluations of party leader images on electoral choice. Exogeneity tests buttress these claims.

Keywords:   exogeneity, leaders, party identification, tactical voting, valence issues

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