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Democratic Consolidation in Eastern Europe Volume 1: Institutional Engineering$
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Jan Zielonka

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199244089

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0199244081.001.0001

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Bulgaria: The (Ir)Relevance of Post‐communist Constitutionalism

Bulgaria: The (Ir)Relevance of Post‐communist Constitutionalism

Chapter:
(p.186) 7 Bulgaria: The (Ir)Relevance of Post‐communist Constitutionalism
Source:
Democratic Consolidation in Eastern Europe Volume 1: Institutional Engineering
Author(s):

Venelin I. Ganev

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199244081.003.0007

Argues that institutional engineering in Bulgaria reflects the enduring legacies of communism, such as inability to solve social problems or to improve the level of economic prosperity. Using Bulgaria as an example, the author delineates the limits of constitutionalism as a tool in the process of democratic consolidation. The chapter views institutional engineering in Bulgaria as a multifaceted social project and suggests a more subtle analysis of the peculiar ways in which a post‐communist context tolerates both elite constraints and elite irresponsibility, the institutionalization of governance, and the endurance of corruption.

Keywords:   Bulgaria, Communist legacy, constitution, corruption, democratic consolidation, elites, governance, institutional engineering, post‐communism

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