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The Government of RiskUnderstanding Risk Regulation Regimes$
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Christopher Hood, Henry Rothstein, and Robert Baldwin

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199243631

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0199243638.001.0001

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The Regime Perspective in Risk Regulation: Implications for Policy and Institutional Design

The Regime Perspective in Risk Regulation: Implications for Policy and Institutional Design

Chapter:
(p.171) 10 The Regime Perspective in Risk Regulation: Implications for Policy and Institutional Design
Source:
The Government of Risk
Author(s):

Christopher Hood (Contributor Webpage)

Henry Rothstein (Contributor Webpage)

Robert Baldwin (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199243638.003.0010

Rehearses what the regime perspective can do for enhancing our understanding of how risk regulation varies, works, and fails. Drawing on the preceeding analysis, the chapter identifies three key problems central to contemporary risk regulation. First, the chapter argues that many of the regimes studied in the book were afflicted by limited institutional coherence, with basic constituent components either missing, malfunctioning or poorly linked. Second, the chapter argues that contemporary trends to reform risk regulation regimes need to take greater account of blame‐avoidance imperatives in the institutional shaping of reform processes. Third, the chapter identifies some of the challenges and intractabilities of actually doing risk regulation, which are often overlooked by commonly cited but rarely followed principles of better regulation. The book concludes with an overall assessment of what future developments in regime analysis might promise for our further understanding of risk regulation.

Keywords:   blame avoidance, institutional coherence, reform, risk regulation

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