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Minority Nationalism and the Changing International Order$
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Michael Keating and John McGarry

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199242146

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0199242143.001.0001

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Nations Without States: The Accommodation of Nationalism in the New State Order

Nations Without States: The Accommodation of Nationalism in the New State Order

Chapter:
(p.19) Chapter 2 Nations Without States: The Accommodation of Nationalism in the New State Order
Source:
Minority Nationalism and the Changing International Order
Author(s):

Michael Keating (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199242143.003.0002

Nationalism has historically been associated with the state and state‐building. Yet in a world in which the state is in many respects weakened, penetrated by transnational and sectoral interests, nationalism appears to be resurgent. It is the argument of this chapter that the transformation of the state has in fact encouraged the re‐emergence of nationalisms within states, but at the same time provides opportunities for the non‐violent resolution of nationalist conflict. This requires a break with the state‐centred tradition of much historical and political science research, an appreciation of the importance of other frameworks of identity and collective action, and a search for opportunities for accommodating nationalist demands within the emerging international regimes. Not all types of nationalist movement can be accommodated in this way, however, and there is still a need for a new model of the state that provides a formula for the recognition of nationality and self‐government in diverse forms.

Keywords:   identity, nationalism, state model

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