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The Politics of Labor in a Global AgeContinuity and Change in Late-Industrializing and Post-Socialist Economies$
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Christopher Candland and Rudra Sil

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199241149

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0199241147.001.0001

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Partisan Loyalty and Union Competition: Macroeconomic Adjustment and Industrial Restructuring in Mexico

Partisan Loyalty and Union Competition: Macroeconomic Adjustment and Industrial Restructuring in Mexico

Chapter:
(p.31) 2 Partisan Loyalty and Union Competition: Macroeconomic Adjustment and Industrial Restructuring in Mexico
Source:
The Politics of Labor in a Global Age
Author(s):

M. Victoria Murillo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199241147.003.0002

After the Debt Crisis of 1982, the PRI implemented policies of stabilization and structural reforms although it had previously advanced protectionism and state intervention during the post‐war period. These reforms triggered processes of industrial restructuring in the private and public sector and challenged the very institutions, which had sustained the historic alliance between unions and the PRI in the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution. Although the majority of Mexican unions were subordinated to the governing party, some unions chose to negotiate or oppose the reforms. This chapter analyses the responses of the Mexican Workers’ Confederation (CTM) and industry‐specific unions in the automobile, education, electricity, oil, and telecommunication sectors, to explain the variation in the responses of Mexican unions. It focuses on the common behaviour of union leaders facing similar challenges linked to structural reform and the resulting exposure to international economic forces. It explains union responses by highlighting the influence of the competition among unions for the representation of workers and the competition among leaders for the control of the union as well as the historical legacies of the PRI‐CTM relationship.

Keywords:   debt crisis, Mexican Workers’ Confederation, Mexico, party loyalty, stabilization, structural reform, union competition, union leaders

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