Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Politics of Labor in a Global AgeContinuity and Change in Late-Industrializing and Post-Socialist Economies$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christopher Candland and Rudra Sil

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199241149

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0199241147.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 25 May 2019

Institutional Legacies and the Transformation of Labor: Late‐Industrializing and Post‐socialist Economies in Comparative‐Historical Perspective

Institutional Legacies and the Transformation of Labor: Late‐Industrializing and Post‐socialist Economies in Comparative‐Historical Perspective

Chapter:
(p.285) 11 Institutional Legacies and the Transformation of Labor: Late‐Industrializing and Post‐socialist Economies in Comparative‐Historical Perspective
Source:
The Politics of Labor in a Global Age
Author(s):

Rudra Sil (Contributor Webpage)

Christopher Candland (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199241147.003.0011

This concluding chapter considers what is gained by juxtaposing the varied analyses within a common framework intended to analyse the effects of distinctive institutional legacies on the responses to common pressures frequently associated with ‘globalization.’ The chapter begins by considering some of the shared features of industrial relations that emerged in the course of industrialization in late developing and socialist states, noting some factors that make it difficult to apply models based on the experiences of Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (O.E.C.D.) countries to the analysis of labour regimes elsewhere. The comparisons also reveal important differences that distinguished industrial relations in socialist countries from those in post‐colonial contexts, and the ways in which these differences may contribute to different patterns and outcomes in the transformation of industrial relations in the two contexts. The remainder of the chapter highlights similarities and differences in trends across the cases considered in the contributions to this volume, and goes on to inductively construct a theoretical scheme for tracing how varied historical inheritances in the late‐industrializing and post‐socialist economies create different sets of expectations, pressures, and challenges for economic reformers as well as for workers and organized labour. The role of unique historical factors and institutional structures is also considered, with new questions raised on the basis of specific variations that occur within or cut across the categories of post‐socialist and post‐colonial settings. The chapter concludes by suggesting that the concept of globalization is most useful when it is employed not as a universal model for projecting trajectories of institutional change but as a more restricted framework for capturing the common challenges facing labour and other economic factors in the process of economic adjustment.

Keywords:   economic reform, globalization, industrial relations, institutional legacies, labour relations, OECD, organized labour, post‐colonial countries, post‐communist countries

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .