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Welfare and Work in the Open Economy Volume II: Diverse Responses to Common Challenges in Twelve Countries$
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Fritz W. Scharpf and Vivien A. Schmidt

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780199240920

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0199240922.001.0001

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A Fine Balance Women's Labor Market Participation in International Comparison

A Fine Balance Women's Labor Market Participation in International Comparison

Chapter:
(p.467) 10 A Fine Balance Women's Labor Market Participation in International Comparison
Source:
Welfare and Work in the Open Economy Volume II: Diverse Responses to Common Challenges in Twelve Countries
Author(s):

Mary Daly

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0199240922.003.0010

One of the central causes of change in the welfare state has been the changing economic role and employment behaviour of women, especially of married women. Factors related to gender are the key to explaining labour‐market variation among developed countries. In explaining how women's presence has transformed labour markets in 23 OECD countries, the chapter draws on a wide range of possible factors, including policy packages, historical trends, and cultural norms about the family and women's roles. The analysis is based on a three‐fold model that includes supply, demand, and country‐specific contextual factors.

Keywords:   culture, demand, developed countries, family, history, labour market, participation, policy, supply, women

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