Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
European Integration After AmsterdamInstitutional Dynamics and Prospects for Democracy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Karlheinz Neunreither and Antje Wiener

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198296409

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198296401.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 October 2019

Political Representation in the European Union: A Common Whole, Various Wholes, or Just a Hole?

Political Representation in the European Union: A Common Whole, Various Wholes, or Just a Hole?

Chapter:
(p.129) 8 Political Representation in the European Union: A Common Whole, Various Wholes, or Just a Hole?
Source:
European Integration After Amsterdam
Author(s):

Karlheinz Neunreither

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0198296401.003.0008

Examines the peculiarities of political representation in the EU. Who represents whom in the European Union? Member States are represented via their governments in the Council, the peoples of the same Member States are represented in the directly elected European Parliament, the regions in the Committee of the Regions, and finally various economic and social groups in the Economic and Social Committee. But is there a political representation of the EU as a whole? The article argues that this is not just a purely theoretical question, but has important practical effects, among others in differentiated integration including the Eurozone arrangements. The European Parliament is directly affected by this situation in which several scenarios are possible. A forward EP strategy would consist in defending its right to represent the whole of the EU, not just its composing parts. This would be close to a federal option. Other scenarios include a strengthening of national parliaments, or––in the worst case––a weakening of political representation both in the Member States and the EU with possible substantial damages for the existing democratic systems.

Keywords:   democratic deficit, differentiated integration, elections, EU Council, European Parliament, federalism, national parliaments, regions, representation

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .